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angrywocunited:

grrspit:

ipomoeaj:

jean-luc-gohard:

the-goddamazon:

We know why.

Don’t forget Charlie Sheen. He’s been arrested for domestic violence at least six times and shot a woman. With a gun. And he’s still got a career.

Sean Penn tied Madonna to a chair and beat her. Fuck him. Fuck all of them.

Michael Fassbender

Matthew Fox

John Lennon

Paul McCartney

Ringo too I’m pretty sure

Phil Spector, although he’s now in jail for killing a lady he beat on Ronnie Spector for years and still got into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Axl Rose

Vince Neil

Sean Penn

Charlie Sheen

Jim Morrison tried to set fire to his girlfriend

Stephen Segal

Tommy Lee

Ozzy Osbourne

Mickey Rourke

Bill Murray

Gary Busey

Tom Sizemore

Christian Slater

James Caan

Josh Brolin

Edward Furlong

I could go on.

The point isn’t that the men on the left don’t deserve everything bad they have coming to them.  The point is where the fuck is all the outrage when the men on the right do it.  So many of our pop culture heroes are abusers and nobody seems to care.

Like, even if we’re gonna stick to the NFL, Ben Roethlisberger patiently sat out his six game suspension for rape and continued on with his career with little outrage. 

If we’re really going to care now about ostracizing perpetrators of domestic violence, we got a lotta slack to pick up.

Adding more to the list:

Gary Oldman - hit ex-wife Donya Fiorentino repeatedly about the face with a telephone receiver in front of their two children.

Sean Connery - thinks an openhanded slap is justified if a woman is a “bitch, or hysterical, or bloody-minded.”

Josh Brolin - was arrested for abusing Diane Lane in 2004.

Glen Campbell - beat Tanya Tucker and on one occasion knocked her teeth out. Glen actually received a tribute at the 2012 Grammy Awards—the same year that Chris Brown received so much vitriol for performing.

Jonathan Rhys Meyers - was arrested in 2005 after he was accused of beating up his teenage girlfriend and throwing a cellphone at her. The 27-year-old actor later made a counter allegation that the 18-year-old girlfriend had assaulted him. The warring couple were both questioned at a London police station before being released on bail. He was also verbally abusive and threatening to a woman who tried to help him up off the floor during one of his drunken airport episodes. “Don’t you know who I am?” Yes dear, you’re the King of fucking England.

Harry Morgan - best known for his role as Col. Sherman Potter in the television series “MASH,” was accused in July 1996 of beating his wife.

Sean Bean - has been arrested for harassing an ex girlfriend and has been reported for domestic assault.

Tommy Lee -pleaded no contest in April 1998 to a felony charge of spousal battery against his wife, former “Baywatch” star Pamela Anderson. Lee received a three-year suspended prison sentence, was required to spend 180 days in jail and ordered to pay a total of $6,200 to a shelter for battered women. Anderson, who filed for divorce shortly after the incident, reportedly had hoped her husband would be spared jail time.

Roman Polanski - raped of a 13-year-old girl before fleeing the country.

Eminem - Wrote the song “Kim” about abusing his wife.

Here’s the lyrics: 

  • Kim: “Baby you’re so precious/Daddy’s so proud of you/Sit down bitch/If you move again I’ll beat the shit out of you”
  • Kim: “There’s a four year old boy lyin’ dead with a slit throat/In your living room, ha-ha/What you think I’m kiddin’ you?/You loved him didn’t you?”
  • Kim: “[sound of his wife choking] NOW BLEED! BITCH BLEED!/BLEED! BITCH BLEED! BLEED!”
  • Wrote a song, “‘97 Bonnie and Clyde,” about murdering his wife and disposing of his body in the presence of his child
  • '97 Bonnie and Clyde: “Oh where’s mama? She’s takin a little nap in the trunk/Oh that smell (whew!) da-da musta runned over a skunk”
  • '97 Bonnie and Clyde: “And mama said she wants to show how far she can float/And don’t worry about that little boo-boo on her throat/It’s just a little scratch - it don’t hurt, her was eatin/dinner while you were sweepin and spilled ketchup on her shirt”
  • '97 Bonnie and Clyde: “Here, you wanna help da-da tie a rope around this rock? (yeah!)/We’ll tie it to her footsie then we’ll roll her off the dock”

Made fun of Tommy Lee and Pamela Anderson’s domestic abuse case in “The Real Slim Shady”

Elvis Presley - According to "Elvis Presley. The Man. The Life. The Legend." written by Pamela Keogh. Elvis was immensely abusive towards Priscilla. He was stationed overseas during WWII where they met. He often lied to her parents to get her to spend the night. He would have sex with her, and would give her amphetamines. (The amphetamines were distributed by the Army to help him sleep, and he gave them to everybody.) When the war ended and he went home, he forced her to come with him. She was expected to sit at home while he had affairs. He didn’t even want to marry her, it was simply a publicity stunt. Elvis was immensely controlling. He made Priscilla dress the way he wanted (and would yell at and insult her when she wore something that he didn’t approve of), do her hair the way he wanted, and wear as much make up as he wanted her to. 

Mel Gibsonassaulted, struck with his fist and choked, his ex girlfriend Oksana Grigorieva while she was still holding her baby. He then went on towards the pool, screaming and yelling and then told Oksana to get the ‘fuck’ out, and went to get his gun. 

(Source: jessehimself, via adventuresofcesium)

" There’s no point to a guy yelling, “Hey sexy baby” at me out of the passenger window of a car as it speeds past. Even if I was into creepy misogynists and wanted to give him my number, I couldn’t. The car didn’t even slow down. But that’s okay, because he wasn’t actually hitting on me. The point wasn’t to proposition me or chat me up. The only point was to remind me, and all women, that our bodies are his to stare at, assess, comment on, even touch. “Hey sexy baby” is the first part of a sentence that finishes, “this is your daily message from the patriarchy, reminding you that your body is public property”. "

" Don’t allow your wounds to transform you into someone you are not. "

- Paulo Coelho (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

thaibrator:

checks important chart before calling travel agency

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"yes i’ll take a one way ticket to Congo, thanks"

(via selfconchesshawty)

justdilla:

Bless whoever made this.

(Source: megahra, via screeching-measel)

brittanyschall:

Riikkas Sormunen

(via selfconchesshawty)

pardonmewhileipanic:

mordicaifeed:

concernedresidentofbakerstreet:

regencyduchess:

Whilst in Sydney in 1994, a man apparently tries to assassinate Prince Charles. And not a single fuck was given by His Royal Highness.

THEY’RE ALL JUST STARING AND JUDGING

"How rude…this bodyguard just shoved me!"

I want to be this rich and indifferent one day

(Source: shewolfofengland, via selfconchesshawty)

thepoliticalnotebook:

If ever a wire photo deserved thought bubbles, it’s this one… Afghanistan’s two presidential candidates — Ashraf Ghani (middle) and Abdullah Abdullah (right) have been battling it out since June over who gets to succeed Karzai. (Who wouldn’t want that job?) They have finally signed an agreement for a unity government in which Ghani will be president and Abdullah his chief executive. This picture of the two of them with Secretary Kerry is from back on August 8th while negotiations were ongoing. Your unity government, ladies and gentlemen.

Photo: AP

(HT Don Gomez)

conductoroftardislight:

heartofalifer:

SOMETIMES I GET SO FUCKING ANGRY WHEN I REMEMBER THAT I AM A GIRL BECAUSE MY MONEY HAS TO GO TO BUYING BRAS FOR THESE STUPID ORGANIC MILK BAGS AND PADS FOR MONTHLY UNWANTED SUBSCRIPTION OF LUCIFER’S WATERFALL LIKE WTF MAN WHY DONT THESE THINGS COME FREE WHEN MY UNWANTED PACKAGE IS GIVEN TO ME SERIOUSLY THO

organic milk bags

(via selfconchesshawty)

theroguefeminist:

sapphrikah:

lavenderlabia:

femmefrustration:

derseking:

femmefrustration:

mgodp:

femmefrustration:

word-riot:

This is the most ridiculous thing I’ve come across in a long time.

I understand the daily hardships that so many people have in a world ruled by white males.

I understand that sometimes this can make it feel as if all white males are the enemy (especially for those who fight for equality).

But posts like this need to stop.

You are not advancing anybodies rights.

You are not promoting anybody’s equality.

This is not activism.

This is hate-mongering.

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Thanks for the contribution :)

I’ve lost track, am I even allowed an opinion these days? Whatever. How about this radical idea: Let’s treat each other equally, and then we’ll all be equal? All this mindless mud-slinging achieves nothing and only serves to demonstrate how true objectives of those involved (notably NOT equality).

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You guys are good at this! :)

This isn’t okay and you need to fuckin stop.

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This is so beautiful it brings a tear to my eye. 

an oldie but a goodie

(via screeching-measel)

wakeupslaves:

12 Racist Logos You Didn’t Know Were Used by Popular Brands

 | Posted by A Moore 


Negro – Magic Steel Wool

Arab website Kabobfest.com reports that this steel wool is manufactured by the German company Oscar Weil, which is owned by the German-Jewish Weil family. The Weils were disowned by the Nazis, but the company was returned to the family after WWII. The “Negro – Magic Steel Wool” logo is actually what a Lebanese importing company uses to market and sell the steel wool in the Middle East. This steel wool is apparently the Middle East’s No. 1 seller.

Aunt Jemima

Aunt Jemima is arguably the most well-known and longest-lasting brand that used a racist caricature to market its product. When Charles Rutt and Charles G. Underwood created a self-rising flour in 1889, Rutt called it Aunt Jemima’s recipe after watching a minstrel show that featured a skit with a Southern mammy named Jemima. In 1989, Quaker Oats, which had purchased the Aunt Jemima Mill Co. in 1926, updated Jemima’s image to a modern African-American woman. But the name stayed.

Black Man Cookie

These weird cookies are made in Romania and are sold in Romania, Turkey and Albania. They are called “Black Man” cookies, obviously in reference to Black people. This edible but racist caricature wears a cape, the letter “B” on his chest, features wavy cornrow-looking hair and a large nose and lips. And, of course, the cookie is chocolate.


Uncle Ben’s Rice

The image of an elderly black man has appeared in ads for Uncle Ben’s Rice since 1946. Like Aunt Jemima, the caricature represented a racial stereotype that lingered after slavery. And, just like Aunt Jemima, the Uncle Ben logo has been updated to reflect a more modern Black person. Also in the same vein as the pancake brand, the name remains, carrying on the practice of whites addressing elderly African-Americans as “uncle” and “aunt” because the titles “Mr.” and “Mrs.” were deemed unsuitable for Blacks.

Chiquita Bananas

Generations of Americans have grown up eating Chiquita bananas. Some may remember Miss Chiquita, the sexually flamboyant Latin American caricature the banana company used to brand the fruit since 1944.

Miss Chiquita is widely thought to have been inspired byBrazilian actress and singer Carmen Miranda, who appeared in ads for Chiquita bananas. The actress has been accused of promoting the exotic Latina stereotype because she became famous for wearing pieces of fruit on her head and revealing, tropical clothing.

Some critics argue that this stereotype is even more offensive because the women, men and children who worked in banana farms toiled in grueling conditions, often falling gravely ill as a result of pesticide exposure.


 

Land O’ Lakes Butter

In 1928, officials from Land O’ Lakes welcomed the idea of using a Native-American woman’s image to sell its butter because the company is based in Minnesota — home of Hiawatha and Minnehaha.

H. Mathew Barkhausen III,  a writer who is of Cherokee and Tuscarora descent, has criticized the image of the Land O’ Lakes maiden, calling it stereotypical. She wears two braids in her hair, a headdress and an animal skin frock with beaded embroidery. Also, for some, the maiden’s serene countenance erases the suffering indigenous people have experienced in the United States.

“Like the hoary fantasies of ‘Indians’ and ‘Pilgrims’ sharing with quiet reverence the first ‘Thanksgiving,’ the Land O’ Lakes butter maiden helps white Americans sidestep and repress the horrific realities of what white Americ


« 

Cream of Wheat

Nadra Kareem Nittle of About.com writes that when Emery Mapes of the North Dakota Diamond Milling Co. set out in 1893 to find an image to market his breakfast porridge, now called Cream of Wheat, he decided the portrayal of a subservient and uneducated Black chef was the best fit.

In a 1921 advertisement, the grinning chef — who was given the name Rastus — holds up a chalkboard with these words: “Maybe Cream of Wheat aint got no vitamines. I dont know what them things is. If they’s bugs they aint none in Cream of Wheat…”

Rastus represented the black man as a childlike, nonthreatening slave. The purpose was to portray African-Americans as content with a separate but (un)equal existence while making white Southerners of the time feel nostalgic about the slavery era. Though there are petitionscalling for its removal the caricature still remains on the promotional packaging for Cream of Wheat today.


 
Conguitos 

Conguitos are the Spanish version of M&Ms – a chocolate-covered peanut snack.  Notice how the name bears a resemblance to the name Congo, which may hint at where the inspiration for the sweets came from. Even if this is not true, the character on the front of the packet speaks for itself.

Fazer Licorice Sticks

For 80 years, Fazer licorice sticks have been wrapped in paper adorned with a “blackface” caricature that many Finnish citizens deemed as ”familiar and positive mental images,” according to the company. Pressure from the EU, Finnish Consumer Agency and Ombudsman, media and others have forced Fazer to change its “racist” mascot. In 2007, Fazer announced that it will phase out the use of the caricature in an effort to have more international appeal.

Eskimo Pie

Most people do not know that a slow-moving and largely unpublicized battle in North America’s northland has quietly raged on against the use of the word “Eskimo” to describe people with Inuit heritage. Therefore, the ice cream treat that uses the derogatory term for the North American tribe became the subject of controversy in 2009 when a Canadian Inuit woman said the product name insulted her heritage. However, the bad publicity has failed to persuade manufacturer Cadbury Pascall to consider a new name.

Watermelon Soda

Many Black people refuse to eat watermelon in public because of the racist stereotype, with roots embedded in slavery, that suggests they have undying love for the fruit. However, this didn’t stop the Miami-based Cawy Bottling Co. from marketing its watermelon soda with a mascot that depicts an image of a Black girl with ponytails eating watermelon on one side and an image of a white boy on the other.  In 2009, Target pulled the beverage from its shelves after coming under fire for selling the watermelon soda with the controversial images.

Darkie Toothpaste

A toothpaste known as “Darkie,” featuring a smiling blackface performer as its logo, was sold for years in various parts of Asia. It was originally manufactured in Shanghai by the Hawley & Hazel Chemical Co. before being bought by the Colgate-Palmolive Co. After pressure from shareholders, religious groups and Black people, Colgate-Palmolive renamed Darkie and redesigned its logo.

Changing the name from Darkie to Darlie didn’t seem to be much of a drastic change; for, while the logo did change to a smiling man of ambiguous racial background in a top hat, in Chinese, the world “darlie” means “black person,” according to Wikipedia.
The product, despite its infamous history, is still sold widely across Asia today, expan

(via screeching-measel)

cupidmike:

mjwatson:

A Response to ‘Women Against Feminism.’

Imagine this:

The year is 2014. You are a white Western woman. You wake up in the morning in a comfortably sized house or flat. You have a full or part-time job that enables you to pay your rent or mortgage. You have been to school and maybe even college or university as well. You can read and write and count. You own a car or have a driver’s licence. You have enough money in your own bank account to feed and clothe yourself. You have access to the Internet. You can vote. You have a boyfriend or girlfriend of your choosing, who you can also marry if you want to, and raise a family with. You walk down the street wearing whatever you feel like wearing. You can go to bars and clubs and sleep with whomever you want.

Your world is full of freedom and possibility.

Then you pick up a newspaper or go online. You read about angry women ranting about sexism and inequality. You see phrases like ‘rape-culture’ and ‘slut-shaming.’ You furrow your brow and think to yourself: ‘What are they so angry about? There is no such thing as sexism anymore.’

Now imagine this:

The year is 2013. You are a 25 year-old Pakistani woman. A few months ago, you married the man you love. A man you choose for yourself. You are also pregnant with his child. You see your life stretching out before you, filled with hope and happiness. Suddenly, you and your husband are dragged away from each other. You are both beaten with bricks and batons. You can’t fight back. You can’t escape. No one comes to help you. Through your fading vision, you look up, and look into the eyes of one of your assailants: into the eyes of your father.

The year is 2013. You are a 23 year-old Indian woman. You are a physiotherapy student with a promising career ahead of you. You are sitting on a private bus travelling home alone on a warm December evening. You gaze out of the window as the buildings of New Dheli rush past you and feel content. Suddenly, a blunt force hits the back of your head and you fall to the floor of the bus. A group of strange men are standing over you. They bring the metal bar down on you again and again and again until all you can taste is the blood filling up your mouth. You pray that you will die soon. And you do, but not then. You are raped, beaten, and tortured over and over again. Death is slow and agonising.

The year is 2014. You are a 13 year-old girl from Niger. You no longer live there though. You are now living in the neighbouring country Nigeria, sitting alone in small room on a small bed in a small apartment high above the city of Kano. You are not allowed to leave. Your stomach is swollen from the unwanted life growing inside of it. You had no choice. The father is a man in his 40s. He is a businessman. He has bought you as his wife. You were a penniless, uneducated girl when he came for you. You don’t know of any life you could have had. Neither did your family: just one less mouth for them to feed. You still have the body of a child, and it’s straining under the pressure from the one inside of you. You feel like you’re about to be split in two. You don’t wonder if you will survive the birth. A part of you doesn’t want to.

These are fictionalised accounts of real events that have happened to real women living in our world today. They follow the past 250 years of women and men campaigning for women to be given equal rights to men to prevent these kinds of injustices and abuses on the grounds of gender taking place. Over the course of this time, campaigners – Feminists, both female and male – have been locked up, beaten, tortured, and even killed, in the pursuit of equality. They did this with pen and ink and print; they did this with their voices; they did this with their bodies; they did this with art and music; they did in courts of law and halls and houses of government that they fought be to allowed into.

They did this so that women would no longer been seen as property, livestock, breeding machines, sex objects, punching bags, or infantile morons. They did this not just for themselves, but also for their daughters, and their daughters, and their daughters for generations to come. They did this for women they would never meet – women who lived across countries, across vast oceans, across the entire globe, and even across time.

They did this so that women like me – a white Western woman – could attend school and university; to learn to read, write, and think critically; to gain a degree; to get a job and be paid an equal salary to a man in the same position; and to sit here with my own computer and type all of this.

Feminism is a movement for freedom, equality, choice, love, compassion, respect, solidarity, and education. We may argue, we may disagree, we may struggle to understand the choices and perspectives of others sometimes, but these core beliefs of the movement have never changed, and they never will.

That is why I am a Feminist.

If you feel that you have so far lived your life unaffected by even the mildest form of sexism – anything from feeling uncomfortable when a man catcalls you in the street, to feeling scared walking home alone at night in a secluded area – and are treated with love and respect by every man in your life, then to you I say: I’m glad for you. If you don’t think you need feminism, then that is a victory for the movement. You have fulfilled all those dreams that every suffragette being force-fed in prison and every ‘witch’ burnt at the stake dreamed you would one day.

But perhaps take a second to consider the life of the Pakistani woman who was beaten to death by her own family for marrying a man of her choosing. Or the life of the Indian woman who was raped, beaten, and murdered on a bus by a gang of men. Or the life of the little girl in Niger who was sold to a man more than twice her own age and forced to carry a baby that may kill her to deliver. Do they still need feminism?

And perhaps take a second to consider this too: Even in our liberal, Western world, why do women still only fill 24% of senior management jobs? Why are more women than men domestically abused or even killed every week at the hands of their male partner or ex-partner? Why is there still a pay gap (in the UK specifically) of 15% for women doing the same jobs and working the same hours as men?

And what about on a cultural level? Have you ever noticed how comedy panel shows usually only have one female panellist compared to 4-5 male ones? That almost every dieting product on the market is solely aimed at women? How a lot of newspapers and advertising campaigns will use a sexualised or pornographic image of a woman to sell news or products that have nothing to do with sex?

Or perhaps on a personal level: Do you choose to wear certain clothes because you want to or because you feel ‘unfeminine’ if you don’t? Do you choose to cover yourself up because you want to or because you feel ashamed or intimidated by a man looking at your body? Do you shave your legs and underarm hair because you want to or because you will look ‘ugly’ if you don’t? Did you parents dress you in pink as a baby because they liked the colour or because you were born a girl? Do you want to have children because you want to or because you are a woman?

When you look at yourself in the mirror in the morning, do you see yourself through your own eyes, or through the eyes of the men that will look at you when you walk out the door?

The fact is, like it or not, you still live a world where gender matters. Where gender controls not just the entire course of your life – but the lives of women all over the world. Every second, a child will be born female in a country where she will persecuted for this random biological occurrence for the rest of her life. So before you hold up your anti-Feminist placard proudly and smile at your own sense of empowerment, think not what Feminism can do for you, but what it can do for that one girl. She needs someone to stand up for her. That someone could be you.

[ x ]

Read this. Read all of this. Then read it again.

(via screeching-measel)

tomhiddlesismyspiritanimal:

anyankaleigh:

baddiebey:

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this is like my fave joke

okay that shit was good.

(via screeching-measel)